Install a VHF Radio on a Boat

How to Install a VHF Radio on a Boat

The increased utilization of phones has decreased utilization of Install a VHF Radio on a Boat by boaters who don’t wander too far seaward. Yet, for the people who like to do some long-range cruising, a VHF radio is a need. Assuming you run into a crisis, you don’t want to take the chance that you probably won’t get a phone signal. In the event that you at any point truly do run into inconvenience, your chances of an ideal response from the authorities are higher while utilizing a VHF radio.

Not many things on your boat are as important as your VHF radio, which is your most reliable connection to the rest of the world. In any case, in the event that it’s not as expected installed, failure is reasonable. Fortunately, installing another VHF is a relatively easy venture that pretty much any boater can do on their own. Simply follow these steps, and you’ll be on the airwaves in a matter of seconds.

Find

the bore size that matches the radio’s incorporated mounting hardware, then drill the mounting openings in the steerage, adhering to the instructions accompanying the radio. After penetrating the openings, vacuum up all fiberglass dust. Run a bead of silicon sealant around the openings, set the binnacle mount in place, and supplement the mounting hardware. Assuming that the included hardware consists of screws, replace them with through-fasteners and aircraft-grade Install a VHF Radio on a Boat, which will keep the mount safer.

Reliable VHF communications are an integral part of any safe, enjoyable day on the water. Handheld VHF radios are popular decision with boaters because of convenience and portability, however with a maximum result of six watts, range for even the best hand-held is restricted to around five miles. Compared to the 25 watts and approximately 25 miles a proper mount unit Install a Marine Radio, the decision is clear as to which you’ll want for primary communications should the excrement hit the rotary oscillator.

Step 1: Securing the Binnacle Mount

Most do-it-yourselfers will binnacle-mount their radio, and that’s what we’ll deal with here. Flush mounts have more shape and space constraint; in addition to you have to cut a large opening in the steerage, a task perhaps best left to the professionals. Fortunately, Install a VHF Radio on a Boat that accompany binnacle mounts also accompany a mounting template. Pick a location for your radio where you can easily operate it while running the boat, and which is safeguarded from the weather and direct daylight, if conceivable.

Secure the mounting template in place with masking tape. Really look at underneath the steerage prior to boring through it, to make sure the area is clear of wires, panels, gauges, and different things! Also actually take a look at space above the template to make certain there’s adequate clearance for the radio and that its location won’t disrupt other gear, like choke development.

Find the boring apparatus size that matches the radio’s incorporated mounting hardware, and drill the mounting openings in the rudder as indicated by the template. After boring the openings, eliminate the template and all fiberglass dust. Run a bead of silicon sealant around the openings, set the binnacle mount in place, and supplement the mounting hardware. Assuming the included hardware consists of screws, replace them with through-fasteners and aircraft-grade Nylock locking nuts, which will keep the mount safer.

Step 2: Running the Wires and Cables

Before you can get capacity to your new radio, you’ll have to penetrate one more opening in the steerage, this one for the wires. To decide the best location, put the radio in the binnacle mount and see where the wiring harness falls. Locate a spot for the opening that won’t drive any hard or abrupt twists in the wires, and make certain to utilize a bit that makes an opening of adequate size for both the wiring harness and the antenna cable.

After penetrating the opening, feed the radio’s wires down into it. You’ll also have to bring the antenna cable up through the opening, on the whole, eliminate the cable’s connector by removing it. Discard the old connector – reusing it takes a chance with an unfortunate connection – and after taking care of the cable up through the rudder, attach another Install a VHF Radio on a Boat connector as far as possible according to the included instructions.

The remainder of the wiring work should be done from under the steerage; contingent upon the situation, you may or may not have to expand the power leads for the radio to reach your power source. Assuming you in all actuality do have to expand them, utilize only the wire type and size(s) that conform to ABYC standards.

Install a VHF Radio on a Boat

Crease butt connectors to the wire connections, safeguard them with the adhesive-lined heat-contract tubing, and close off any gaps with fluid electric tape. At the terminal finishes, pleat on terminal connectors, again safeguarding the connections with adhesive-lined heat-shrivel tubing and fluid electric tape.

Don’t attach the terminal connectors to the power source right now; we’ll do this as we complete the final stage of this task.

Step 3: Interfacing the VHF with Your GPS to Allow DSC Functionality

You may be enticed to skirt this step. Don’t! According to the Coast Guard, despite the fact that all VHFs sold in the U.S. are legally necessary to have DSC functionality, 90% of the boats with GPS and VHF units onboard don’t have them appropriately interfaced despite the fact that DSC (which gives the Coast Guard your exact location, personality, and boat information automatically, assuming you make a mayday call), is one of the best and most financially savvy safety features available today.

Getting your GPS and VHF to communicate is much easier than a great many people think. The units talk via a NMEA data stream (NMEA 0183 and/or NMEA 2000) that requires only two wiring connections: a NMEA data in/out, and a ground. Unfortunately there’s no standard variety coding for these wires, so you’ll have to allude to your proprietor’s manuals to figure out which wire is which.

Once you’ve done in this way, connect the GPS data-out wires with the Install a VHF Radio on a Boat, by pleating on butt connectors. Once again, polish them off with adhesive-lined heat-contract tubing and fluid electrical tape. CAUTION: Never use wire nuts in place of butt connectors for these (or any other onboard electrical) connections! More established GPS units may not have a NMEA data yield; assuming that your GPS is that old, now is the right time to put resources into another unit.

Step 4: Securing the System

With everything in place, now is the right time to batten down the hatches. Start by getting a clamshell fitting (see photo above) over the wiring opening in the rudder, and seal the opening with a healthy portion of silicone to forestall water intrusion. Then, use attach wraps or cushioned clamps to help the power and NMEA interface wires at least every 18 inches, as per ABYC recommendations.

Finally, with the battery switch switched off, attach the power Install a VHF Radio on a Boat. Ideally this would be negative to a ground bar, and positive to a dedicated electrical switch at a breaker panel with stumbling capacity as suggested by manufacturer.

Presently, you’re ready to betray and test the framework. Play out a standard radio keep an eye on a non-commercial and non-government (“working”) channel, for example, 68 or 72, to make sure everything is operating appropriately. Then, at that point, fill the cooler with snacks and beverages and go partake in a break the dock. After finishing this task, you merit it.

The increased utilization of phones has decreased utilization of Install a VHF Radio on a Boat by boaters who don’t wander too far seaward. Yet, for the people who like to do some long-range cruising, a VHF radio is a need. Assuming you run into a crisis, you don’t want to take the chance that…

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